Ketchup With a Side of Autism: From Anger to Acceptance – Chapter 2: The Search for a Cure

Debbie Now that she had a diagnosis, I had begun my quest to conquer and cure Debbie of Autism.  I was in a truly devastated state. All my dreams of having a normal mother-daughter relationship, similar to the one I had with my own mom, had been shattered in the blink of an eye. I didn’t see the possibilities. I only saw the impossibilities. It didn’t help that Debbie’s team of educators harped constantly on what she was unable to do.  Instead of presuming competence, they presumed incompetence. I felt like I was drowning and there was no hope of being saved. Except there was.

I turned my attention to the great and powerful Google. I researched everything that came under the umbrella of “Autism Cure.” I did have limits. Chelation and HBOT were off the table. Still though, I was looking for that Jenny McCarthy miracle cure. Looking back, I’m not really proud of those decisions. I didn’t consult a doctor. I was going blind and I was determined to do it on my own. I think. No, I know that I was out to prove to everyone, especially Debbie’s naysayers, that she was more than a diagnosis and that we would defy the odds. I kept up my feverish search until I found what I was looking for.

Diets and holistic treatments caught my attention. As someone who likes to take the easy road when possible, I started with the holistic vitamins. I found a site called The Autism Research Institute. This institute was founded by a man by the name of Dr. Bernard Rimland. Dr. Rimland studied the uses of Vitamins B6 and C, Magnesium and DMG in children who had Autism. He had several successes in various trials with Autistic children. These children became more social.  They had better eye contact. They had better communication. It was like magic! All I had to do was order these supplements off of the recommended Kirkman vitamins site and voila! Debbie was going to be a normal, healthy 5 year old girl! Right? Nope. Not so much.

We started Deb on a daily regimen of DMG, TMG, fish oil, and an “extra special” vitamin supplement called Super Nu-Thera. Super Nu-Thera had 300% of the daily allowance of recommended doses of B6, C, and Magnesium. Miracles awaited me. Language was going to come. Socialization was going to be a piece of cake. Fine motor skills were going to fall into place and I was going to be able to look at everyone and say, “See?! I told you so!” I was like a kid waiting for Santa on Christmas Eve. I couldn’t wait to rub it in everyone’s face. And wait I did because the miracle didn’t come. But I wasn’t down and out yet! Oh no, not this Warrior Momma! I’m a fighter and if I’m going down, I’ll at least go down swinging.

Facebook became a new outlet for me and my mission. I sought out Warrior Mommas on similar journeys and found several who had managed to wave the Jenny McCarthy magic wand. They had cured their kiddos through a new diet called the Gluten/Caesin Free Diet. At this point Debbie started having GI issues.  She was gassy and had a really hard time going to the bathroom. This diet was touted as being able to relieve gut issues. As the gut issues were relieved, children with Autism were communicating and socializing better. I’m not a diet person by nature. I can’t even stick to a Dr. mandated low-cholesterol diet for myself. But if this was going to make Debbie better, then I was game. I cleared the offending food and drink from my house. I bought organic everything. I bought almond milk, tofu chocolate pudding along with gluten free noodles, chicken nuggets, and cookies. And my dream was going to come true. And my life was going to be perfect. Everything was going to work out the way I intended. Here’s the thing about the best laid plans. They rarely, if ever, work out the way you intend. Debbie refused mostly everything, especially her staples. In short, it was a miserable failure. Nothing is worse to a mom than a child who refuses to eat so back to the drawing board I went.

I started perusing Facebook yet again and came across a mom, who swore with every fiber in her being, that her child had been cured by drinking raw camel milk. Raw camel milk is not only expensive, but extremely hard to find and it is not FDA approved. However, order away I did. I excitedly poured the milk for Debbie and awaited the results. She drank it reluctantly, until she didn’t.  It didn’t matter anyway because guess what? Nothing changed.

I was frustrated. I was angry. I was feeling helpless, and unfortunately, I was blaming Debbie for her Autism. But then something miraculous did happen. A change for the better was just around the corner and it didn’t come in the form of a diet, supplement, or vitamin. It came in the form of a teacher who saw Debbie as a person instead of a diagnosis.

Advertisements

12 thoughts on “Ketchup With a Side of Autism: From Anger to Acceptance – Chapter 2: The Search for a Cure

  1. I especially love how you ended it. Now that you have me at the edge of my seat, you need to write chapter 3 tonight!!! Although I have known you pretty well for over a year now, I am anxious to hear Debbie’s story from the beginning as a way to fill in the gaps of what I haven’t yet learned about your journey.

  2. Karen says:

    a cliff hanger REALLY……not fair! So…..when do we get more? FYI: I love the way you write!!!
    I WILL BUY THE BOOK!!!

  3. Thanks for this wonderful chapter! I love how you speak the truth! This book is going to be so helpful for so many moms and dads out there, as well as for all of us that work with these precious children!

  4. Can’t wait for chapter 3!

    I have to admit that I’ve followed you on FB for awhile but don’t know the full story of Debbie, so I’m just “hearing” the story for the first time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s